What Makes An Ideal Office?

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Have you ever wondered if there were some positive changes that you could make to your working environment in order to enhance success rates and, as a result, expand your business?

 

If you are in a managerial role, then you will realise just how much thought and consideration has to go in to the wellbeing of people who are under your wing. It can become very easy to get caught up in the statistics of a successful business and forget that the people getting the job done for you have thoughts and feelings. So, what can you do to ensure that you have a happy and productive workforce at all times? Implementing HR Software would be a good place to start. This software helps you to stay on top of employee matters, ensuring that they receive the treatment they deserve. It also works as an excellent organisation tool, meaning you will no longer feel the stress of having too much weight on your shoulders. You could also look at getting a serviced office like Loc8 Commercial, to reduce some stress of looking after the office.

This infographic displays the results of a survey which many office workers took throughout Britain, to help establish what an ideal office would be like. It is worth taking some tips from this guide, as the public have spoken and been honest about what they would wish to see in the perfect office. With matters such as team bonding, office perks and office hours taken in to consideration, you can really benefit from the results shown!

 

1750 COMMENTS

  1. When managers are aware of how the employees’ hospitality, the seamless operation of front and back of the house functions combined the psychology of creating an environment where guests “Feel” special.
    Same goes when you listen to your people within the organization, you’ll feel extra special.

  2. I excel at shaping and executing marketing messages- and few things are more thrilling than being able to get in at the ground floor to work with people who are just as passionate as I am about helping a business succeed. Humor is great- too- and when I read the description for this job- everything fell into place.

  3. What makes a perfect working space? Does being a neat freak really make you more productive? Last month Wired editor-in-chief Scott Dadich argued the case for office desks free from coffee stains, scribbled notes and all other traces of human presence. Meanwhile, the Guardian’s Steven Poole advocated the profitable benefits of messiness. So who is right?

  4. A Plaza acts as the vibrant and dynamic heart of the landscape, a place where people can intuitively take the pulse of the organization. They are open, welcoming, public spaces situated at major intersections and highly trafficked areas of the work environment. They support a diverse range of experiences and populations. A Plaza encourages mixing and mingling, enables multiple work activities simultaneously, helps broadcast information, and provides amenities as a point of attraction.

  5. It offers easy access to analog and digital tools and surfaces to display and create work. People should always be able to see and hear each other easily—even when not physically present. A variety of postures and distinct groupings of mobile furniture allow people to choose and arrange how space best suits their work in the moment. Adequate circulation space encourages movement.

  6. Prior to a meeting, it provides a gathering space for attendees. After, it takes advantage of the visual continuity between the landing and its contiguous meeting space as an aid to contextual memory and helps drive the work that happens in this Setting. Accommodations that welcome a brief gathering drive the utility of each Landing.

  7. A Cove is a compact space within proximity to individual work points or common areas that enables people to assemble and engage with each other for a short period of time. A Cove may also accommodate remote participants with provisions for fixed and personal technology. Enough boundary to avoid disrupting others is essential—especially with the addition of technology. Territorial by nature, Coves are used more readily by the people working nearest to them.

  8. A Cove may also accommodate remote participants with provisions for fixed and personal technology. Enough boundary to avoid disrupting others is essential—especially with the addition of technology. Territorial by nature, Coves are used more readily by the people working nearest to them.

  9. A variety of individual and group work points with ergonomic seating enable people to freely and intuitively cycle between tasks and activities as they use a variety of fixed, mobile, personal, and remote technology. Maintaining proximity and the identity of the team within the Clubhouse helps drive the work that occurs there. A Clubhouse should offer ample surfaces to display and share in-process work. This Setting has defined edges with porosity for visual access.

  10. For this reason, they tend to be located along highly trafficked routes, or adjacent to busy intersections within the landscape. A Jump Space may help connect people from disparate locations or teams who otherwise would not meet. It can be configured with comfortable seating and with bar or table-height surfaces.

  11. A Jump Space consists of highly usable work points that facilitate temporary work between other activities. For this reason, they tend to be located along highly trafficked routes, or adjacent to busy intersections within the landscape. A Jump Space may help connect people from disparate locations or teams who otherwise would not meet. It can be configured with comfortable seating and with bar- or table-height surfaces.

  12. A Hive is a space where numerous people can do a diverse range of work harmoniously. The Setting offers a grouping of individual work points and ergonomic seating. Variances in the spatial division, storage density, and boundary define the character of the space and help nurture the diverse types of work that occur there. Further ergonomic considerations may include the optimal placement of fixed and adjustable technology.

  13. A Haven is a small shelter where focused work can be done without distraction or alternatively, a place to unwind. It can be an enclosed room, such as a private office, or a semi-sheltered or screened-in space out in the open. Depending on its intended use, the Setting may offer a work surface and ergonomic seating or take on a more relaxed feel. It should also easily accommodate the use of personal technology and other tools. A shared Haven must be easily locatable in the landscape.

  14. As any good cook makes a recipe unique by flavoring it to her own taste, so too can an organization customize the Settings to reflect its culture, identity, and aspirations. Says Greg Parsons, Vice President of Landscape Environments, “A workplace with the right mix of Settings, tailored to the character and purpose of the organization, sets people free to realize their potential. It enriches everyone’s experiences and improves performance.” In this type of environment, people can do their best, and both individuals and the organization can prosper.

  15. Designing a Living Office Landscape is a lot like cooking a complex dish, or at least that’s how Lori Gee, Herman Miller’s Vice President of Applied Insight sees it. “Herman Miller’s Settings are spatial recipes,” she says. “They attend to the cognitive, social, behavioral, and physical needs identified by the Modes of Work—a range of activities people engage in, no matter what they do or where they work.”

  16. Herman Miller’s Living Office provides people with a variety of Settings—spaces optimized to support work and interaction. Each of the 10 Settings is distinct in purpose, scale, and sociability. The right mix can foster an office landscape where people can immediately grasp where they can go and what they can do to achieve their goals.

  17. The extraordinary building they were in, equal parts spaceship and womb, was more significant than they knew. Rising above an unprepossessing demolition site to the west, it brings together about 2,000 staff who had previously been spread across the borough. The prize it has won is a major endorsement of a controversial approach to development that’s now being taken by councils across the country. The kids didn’t care about all that, though. They just wanted to have a go at the percussion.

  18. Doing a thorough research on available furnished office space in Bangalore is sure to help the person to take the right decision in his favor and get an office space that can help propel his business and achieve sure success. Furthermore, being fully furnished, the coworking space does become an ideal business set up for all entrepreneurs so that they can focus efficiently and effectively on promoting their business.

  19. The fact is that coworking is the in-thing now and its demand has been increasing rapidly. To meet this demand, the workspace owners have been trying to have their typical office space to be turned into coworking space, to accommodate a maximum number of entrepreneurs, individuals, and freelancers, who are eager to try out their luck in business, without the huge expense or hassles attached.

  20. Doing some research can help the person not only to find a suitable place in a wonderful location, but also very low rents that are sure not to bother the new entrepreneurs, who generally are seen to be low on funds. Most of the coworking office spaces are furnished and there are several choices to choose, ranging from meeting rooms, event spaces, training, private cabins, open desks and the like.

  21. The individual does not have to bother about requiring searching for the most appropriate facilities and furniture that is otherwise required by every business or need hefty security deposits. These days, there are available easily coworking spaces, which one has to find and select according to their specific requirements, budget, and convenience.

  22. Doing a thorough research on available furnished office space in Bangalore is sure to help the person to take the right decision in his favor and get an office space that can help propel his business and achieve sure success. Furthermore, being fully furnished, the coworking space does become an ideal business set up for all entrepreneurs so that they can focus efficiently and effectively on promoting their business.

  23. The fact is that coworking is the in-thing now and its demand has been increasing rapidly. To meet this demand, the workspace owners have been trying to have their typical office space to be turned into coworking space, to accommodate a maximum number of entrepreneurs, individuals, and freelancers, who are eager to try out their luck in business, without the huge expense or hassles attached.

  24. Coworking space does provide the individual with plenty of facilities include low rents. Doing some research can help the person not only to find a suitable place in a wonderful location, but also very low rents that are sure not to bother the new entrepreneurs, who generally are seen to be low on funds. Most of the coworking office spaces are furnished and there are several choices to choose, ranging from meeting rooms, event spaces, training, private cabins, open desks and the like.

  25. The individual does not have to bother about requiring searching for the most appropriate facilities and furniture that is otherwise required by every business or need hefty security deposits. These days, there are available easily coworking spaces, which one has to find and select according to their specific requirements, budget, and convenience.

  26. We had to include a picture that featured one of our favorite office accessories: headphones. No matter where you work (by yourself or in a group), having the ability to tune everything out can be a great blessing. Do you find music helps you get things done? What kind of music is your “productivity” playlist made of?

  27. We like the look, but does anyone else notice how far up the keyboard is for someone sitting in that chair? We’ve found that reaching too much to type can really take a toll throughout the day (and week, and month). How do you like to sit at the office desk: straight up, or more relaxed? Where’s the ideal place for that keyboard?

  28. A traditional office: big chair, a big desk, plenty of light, maybe a wall mural or piece of artwork. While not the “cool” thing anymore, there’s still something to be said for clearly defined boundaries of “work” and leisure,” and with an office like this one that line is pretty clear. Is this kind of executive suite still a thing to be sought after, or do you think its time has gone?

  29. Lots of space, lots of collaborative areas, short on privacy. Not the place answer your cell phone. For those of you who’ve worked in this environment: do you find yourself working more when surrounded by others, or less? Does the constant interaction energize or drain you?

  30. We’re not sure the name “cubicle” really fits; sure, it’s built off the cubicle concept, and it could certainly fit in a cubicle-sized space, but it’s way cooler. There’s a best of both worlds feel to it, as it’s open enough to allow chance meetings but closed enough to cut down on some of the distractions.

  31. The answer depends on what gets the most done: simplicity, focus, collaboration, prestige. We’ve tried many different office scenarios, and even after 30 years, we’re still figuring out the best way to get things done for ourselves and our clients.

  32. Some people dream of the big executive office; you know, the one with the big desk and penthouse view. Certainly, that was the goal of the last century. However, other, newer, workplaces focus on open spaces. Our friends down at the Hub here in Raleigh offer lots of areas that are wide open, and a good number of startups have “brought down the walls” to encourage cooperation and group work. Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer recently made waves when she announced that all employees would be required to come to the office instead of working from home.

  33. Use Architizer. No, seriously—at least to scope out projects, and find out what you like. Once you find out what you like, find someone that you like. There’s a relationship aspect to working with an architect, too. You should choose someone you can get along with because the building process is a long and intimate one.

  34. I’d recommend they don’t just go for a look “oh, someone used recycled wood, let’s do that” but rather focus on the functionality. Make a room list, and give an accurate brief of what programmatic spaces you need and what connections each of those requirements, and what kind of space it is. Is it a quiet space? Is it in the center of activity? Is it a sunny space? Basically, that kind of spreadsheet will save a lot of time, and the architect doesn’t need to come in and play analyst. He or she can get right to work.

  35. That’s not to say these systems can’t be aestheticized, too. Think about the Pompidou Center in Paris. We’ve all seen air-conditioning ducts installed beautifully. They can be something nice in and of themselves. All it really needs is a consideration—looking for the answer within the material itself.

  36. Maybe the trend is the rejection of the cubicle. You just conjure visions of Working Girl when you think about old cubicles. I think what people are experimenting with is getting that privacy without sequestering people into that defined space. Innovative approaches to privacy—those are interesting.

  37. Maybe the ultimate version of this concept is what I call the “box within the box” concept. Companies are experimenting with creating a sort of private space that’s perhaps transparent, but quiet for a worker. The creative process becomes something unfolding in an aquarium … something to watch happen. It’s an update of an old idea.

  38. It’s fun to see people fool around with that idea. From the pool tables of the nineties to the bean bag chairs of the dot-com boom, common spaces are changing, and becoming not just rest areas, but productive areas. In our Coolest Offices competition, we saw a couple of examples of interior amphitheaters, where either a presentation could be held, or a collaborative meeting. That’s new and interesting.

  39. Specifically, you see a clear trend towards casual gathering spaces being a place to not just congregate, but also to actually do work, the employee lounge is now being used as part of the creative process. It’s fun to see people fool around with that idea. From the pool tables of the nineties to the bean bag chairs of the dot-com boom, common spaces are changing, and becoming not just rest areas, but productive areas. In our Coolest Offices competition, we saw a couple of examples of interior amphitheaters, where either a presentation could be held, or a collaborative meeting. That’s new and interesting.

  40. On a larger scale, in-fill—the idea of repurposing entire buildings—is big. In cities, in particular, cool people are always on the vanguard of turning unused spaces into something useful. And in urban areas, unexpected office projects are popping up more frequently.

  41. Green architecture was all about finding the most environmentally-friendly products, but I think that has shifted. Today, it’s not about finding the most ecological countertop; it’s using less countertop—or repurposing and recycling a countertop. Think about it: If you don’t cover your ceiling with another layer of material, you’ve saved a huge amount of carbon in the manufacturing of that material, the transporting of that material, and the installation of that material. Not to mention cost.

  42. With the innovation of more human control over the atmosphere—electric lights and air conditioning—all of a sudden, offices were liberated from the window, which meant that architects could design incredibly deep floor plans. This over-control of the environment has been a detriment to the American worker. In Europe, there are laws that a desk cannot be more than a few feet from a window—the notion of an office without windows is actually illegal in Europe. In the States, only now is the trend changing back to a healthier, more natural way of building.

  43. It can become very easy to get caught up in business and financial matters, rather than paying attention to the wants and needs of employees. Taking time to listen to their preferences and actually implement the changes that they wish to see will make remarkable changes for both you and your business.

  44. Ensuring that employees are happy in their working environment is extremely important as happiness is the main contributor to a productive and motivated team. Cezanne HR carried out a survey to establish what Britain would deem as their ideal office, taking a huge variety of factors into consideration.

  45. A building can positively affect ability by providing comfortable ambient conditions, by enabling individual control and adjustment of conditions, and by reducing health and safety risks. Negative impacts on the ability to do work are associated with conditions that are uncomfortable, distracting, hazardous or noxious.

  46. We spend a great deal of our lives in the office (although this will reduce as SaaS, and other technologies that allow us to work from anywhere, increase in popularity) and feeling comfortable is a priority when it comes to productivity, good health and mental wellbeing.

  47. People believe that working by daylight results in less stress and discomfort than working by electric light and that working by electric lighting is detrimental to health, particularly in the long term (although there is no evidence to suggest that artificial light has any long-term health effects).

  48. Even if we do burn the candle at both ends, the right amount of light could combat the effects of a poor night’s sleep. A 2013 study from the Netherlands found that people who were exposed to more daylight during the week reported feeling more energetic and less tired, regardless of how long they slept the night before.

  49. A sunny day is equivalent to 100,000 lux (the measure of brightness), while indoor lighting only provides around 300 lux. The average person needs exposure to 1,000 lux to enjoy the full benefits light offers. Without enough light, our body clocks can’t function correctly, which in turn can affect our sleep. Not getting enough sleep affects our alertness, health and general productivity.

  50. Making efforts to provide a pleasant working environment for employees should be at the top of every business leader’s priorities. It can affect turnover rates, productivity and, ultimately, profits. Listed below are some of the factors that should be considered when planning your office design for maximum results.

  51. When weighing up your options, remember that one of the best things about shared offices, hot-desking and even working in an internet cafe if you don’t need to make any long-term commitments. If it’s not for you, you can simply move on. For agile and open-minded start-ups, workspace options have never been better.

  52. Two such cloud-based tools are Slack and Trello. Slack is a chat platform that allows teams to keep in touch, while Trello is a digital app that helps organize workflow into a convenient digital Post-it Note-style system. Tools like these can easily be utilized to create virtual spaces that replicate activities that might have traditionally taken place in an office.

  53. Given the workspace-related cost challenges that start-ups and small businesses are facing at the moment, particularly in the Greater Dublin area, businesses can benefit from thinking outside the box about their requirements. Meeting up just one or two days a week is a solution that works well for many teams in terms of productivity and work-life balance, especially when the cloud already facilitates easy and collaborative remote working.

  54. It gives us a great sense of pride to be able to bring our potential clients to Dogpatch and show them the vibrant, energetic and innovative home that we have, which very much matches our company’s ethos, says Hesus Inoma, founder and CEO of insurtech start-up WeSavvy, one of the companies based at Dogpatch Labs. This, coupled with the opportunity to work with fast-paced businesses and other hardworking members, makes it a perfect home for us and our company.

  55. Firms must consider what their chosen office says about them if they plan to host meetings with clients, or events that reflect their brand. For instance, a graphic design start-up won’t want to present its work to clients in a windowless room with white walls, and a company that runs regular conferences will likely require access to a relevant on-site space or at least somewhere close by.

  56. Working alongside a diverse group of driven individuals allows you to understand different perspectives. It fosters new ways of thinking, Walsh says. Co-working gives you more than a place to work and some people to share a space with, it allows you to network on a daily basis, and provides you with a community support system that wants you to succeed.

  57. You can’t just drop a team from a large corporate office into a quirky co-working space and expect them to start sitting on beanbags and sharing playlists. Work culture is often built alongside or before a business actually selects a workspace. So an awareness of which values matters most to your company, an understanding of the culture of your chosen workspace and a certain level of open-mindedness are all really important.

  58. A shared office space can also improve workers’ well-being by encouraging a better work-life balance, making employees feel less isolated at work. This has multiple benefits for a business: according to the Economic and Social Research Institute, work-related illness causes 790,000 productive days to be lost in Ireland annually, while around 18% of those absences are directly related to stress, anxiety, and depression.

  59. The rising cost of office space isn’t the only motivator for seeking out an alternative, dynamic workspace option, though. Being surrounded by like-minded businesses at a co-working or shared office space also means you have a network of possible clients and collaborators at your disposal. Interacting with firms from other industries can help ensure that water-cooler chats become productive, useful moments that add value to both staff and companies.

  60. When planning a new workspace, Office Principles is often guided by the reality that, in most offices, the number of employees present at any given time is only between 60% and 75%. “We use those statistics to exploit the fact that a business can generally use less space overall and reduce the cost of occupancy,” says Jenkins, adding that office rental costs have skyrocketed in recent years.

  61. Twenty years ago, people dreamt of having their very own corner office, says workspace expert Chris Jenkins of Office Principles, an office design company that works with clients across Europe. Today’s entrepreneurs no longer aspire to this: they mostly just want a chair, a surface and somewhere to power up their phone and laptop. With that comes the freedom to feel that, whether they’re in their home office at 11 pm or using the local Starbucks as their office base, it all counts as bona fide work time.

  62. Add to this an acceptance that you really don’t need the sole use of your very own business premises to be effective, and the options available to today’s SMEs are as varied as they are exciting, not to mention affordable, too. Whether you choose to work from home, a local co-working hub or a luxurious shared office space, there are a growing number of alternatives to the cubicles of years gone by.

  63. This appeals to landlords and developers because the risk of development is reduced. However, it also should be attractive to city fathers because refurbishment often rescues a building from obsolescence and demolition, and should also very appealing to occupiers because of the significant beneficial environmental and financial implications.

  64. Companies are looking for office space that differentiates; that sets their business apart from their peer group and attracts and retains staff. Much of this relates to a dynamic fit out of the office space by the occupier, but it also is linked to acquiring the most appropriate office in the right location.

  65. Workers’ biggest frustration is the lack of a quiet space for working, and the research seems to back this statement up by suggesting that there is a negative productivity gap for businesses based in open plan offices. Enough of the statistics. To me, it is clear that needs of the occupier, and as a result, the appropriate use of offices is changing, and quickly.

  66. The most important issue for workers in the UK is the length of their commute to work, perhaps not surprising as London data is included in the research. However, Glasgow has the highest percentage of workers stating that access to good public transport connections as being “important” (91 percent); 73 percent want good food facilities; 47 percent think a good environmental performance of a building is important; and 74 percent demand excellent quality wireless technology.

  67. For generation Z or the millennials (and if you have to Google what this means, it probably tells you something). The workplace is a social environment; much more than just a place to work during the day. If I told you that more than 83 percent of generation Z leave their first job within three years, the quicker employers realize that the quality of their working environment will make a huge difference to attracting and retaining staff, the better.

  68. The younger you are, the more likely you are to want to work in the city center. Unless you work in commercial property, it probably won’t have crossed your mind that in both Glasgow and Edinburgh, we have been accustomed to watching shiny glass and metal structures rising from the ground to satisfy the occupational needs of businesses.

  69. This may seem a dry subject, but I suspect most people reading this article will be doing so at their desk or traveling to or from their workplace. Everyone has a view on their working environment – good or bad. So perhaps it’s worth giving this some further thought?

  70. One of the best ways of determining whether an office is ideal for you is to make sure you tour as many office properties that match your requirements as possible. Having a good Tenant Rep Broker to “hold your hand” throughout the process will help you make an informed decision and find the ideal office that matches your financial, operational and strategic requirements.

  71. Office space is calculated on a cost per square foot basis, so to enable you to determine how many square feet you need to use the Office Space Calculator from Help Moving Office to avoid securing an office that is either too big or too small – both of which can be budget breakers!

  72. Cost is said to be the main determining factor when choosing office space. Now, more than ever before, businesses are being forced to minimize expenditure and maximize efficiency, and with real estate being one of the highest expenditure for a company, businesses need to be scrupulous when it comes to office rental costs.

  73. Whether you’re looking for a new home for your business or looking to lease your first office for your start-up business, there are many factors to consider that will help you land the ideal office. Space will need to suit your company’s working culture, company brand as well as meet your monetary and timeframe constraints.

  74. When you are looking to change or adapt to your work environment, don’t set limitations on how to get there. Be open about where you would like to end up and set yourself a plan to get there. Start by having a conversation with your manager about the education and training that you would like to have: open the door for communication about your future right from the start.

  75. If you see a coworker struggling with a project or have advice for them, try offering support by offering assistance or thanking them for working so hard. Don’t approach the situation with immediate changes or advice on how something should be done, others will generally get defensive doing this and you want to build a good working relationship.

  76. When you are looking to change or adapt to your work environment, don’t set limitations on how to get there. Be open about where you would like to end up and set yourself a plan to get there. Start by having a conversation with your manager about the education and training that you would like to have: open the door for communication about your future right from the start.

  77. Your work environment, whether you are currently employed or looking for a job, isn’t always going to be a perfect fit from the start but there should be some immediate glimpse that it will work for you eventually. A culture that is molded around a company vision may not be a home run for you right away but don’t be shy if there are some areas that fit your idea of culture: as long as the company mostly fits the culture that you are expecting, give it a try!

  78. 70% of workers in America are disengaged in the office. Are you one of them? It’s hard to feel productive, involved in the company, and motivated when you aren’t regularly engaging with the culture of your office. Identifying your ideal work environment is a great start to changing that feeling.

  79. Doing so makes them feel more valued and increases their enthusiasm, which in turn drives them to put in more effort at their job. It’s not only the employees; managers should be equally open to feedback as well. Allowing your subordinates to suggest changes and then implementing those changes is a great way to create trust and gain loyalty. Any business that has this aspect nailed down is always going to succeed.

  80. The importance of open and effective communication in a workplace has been touted countless times and for good reason. Employees who interact with each other regularly soon build a rapport and work more effectively as a group. And the flow of communication should exist across all strata of positions in a company, from the upper management to the junior-most employees, everyone should be asked to contribute to decision-making and ideating.

  81. Employees who can dictate their own work schedule will invariably be more satisfied at work due to the autonomy they’ve been granted. No one likes being forced to adhere to schedules and policies that exist just for the sake of it and doing so robs them of any pleasure they may derive from their jobs.

  82. Individuals are more creative and generate better ideas when left alone, divergent thinking, whereas groups are better at selecting the most promising ideas out of the pool, convergent thinking. To this effect, she suggests that brainstorming sessions follow a strategy where individuals are asked to write down their ideas and then share them with the group for feedback. Conducting multiple rounds of such sessions allows employees to build upon others’ ideas while deciding which ones are worth pursuing.

  83. While brainstorming sessions are believed the best way to unleash the potential of the company’s employees as a collective group, research has proven that they don’t work. A study by Yale University showed that brainstorming sessions end up reducing the creativity of individuals participating in them while those who are asked to ideate on their own often come with better and more effective solutions to the presented problems.

  84. Not only that, such offices also result in more sick leaves being taken by employees as compared to their closed-space counterparts. So, perhaps it’s time to eschew open-plan offices in favor of ones that accord employees private spaces to do their work without distractions.

  85. Open-plan offices seem to be all the rage these days. A trend initially sparked by startups, it has since been adopted by countless enterprises in a bid to reinvigorate their employees through what they think will improve communication and bolster the flow of ideas. But several studies have shown that open-plan offices yield countless negative results and hardly any positive ones.

  86. The goal of environmental exploration is to help you understand what you are ultimately looking to achieve from your work. Gaining an awareness of different occupations and work environments helps you identify best fits with your life themes — that is, the combination of values, interests, and abilities specific to you. Research shows that individuals who exhibit awareness of self and environment make more compatible career choices, perform better and longer in their employment positions, and derive more satisfaction from work.

  87. Not only does collaboration make employees happier, but around half of millennials say workplace friendships motivate them, and 30 percent say these friendships make them more productive. Of course, there are tasks that only require one person. But when possible, encourage employees to team up and work together for the sake of their satisfaction and productivity. You’ll spark innovative ideas across the workplace generational divide.

  88. Millennials want someone to look up to. They want someone they can trust with more than just evaluations and questions about office policy. As they begin integrating into the workforce, they want people who will help them through the rough patches of starting a new company and guide them along the way. They want mentors.

  89. Leaders as People
    Millennials may have a different view of how they’d like to work, but they still respect the more experienced generations in the workforce. They want to work for people who will inspire them to do great work. They’re not inspired by things like money or status, but rather by core competencies and personality traits.

  90. No place is perfect, but if you begin with the end in mind and think about walking in your employee’s shoes, you will be well on your way to creating a positive, productive workplace where people are happy to be part of your vision, contributing to your end goal.

  91. Treat each employee as a person. Remember to recognize people not only for what they do but who they are. Understand that each employee yearns for respect in both their work and their personal lives. Get to know your employees. Celebrate personal and professional milestones. Support employees when they face personal challenges. A little bit of caring goes a long way toward employee and brand loyalty.

  92. Have a little fun. Being happy at work includes finding your passion, working toward it and having fun along the way. It’s about the journey as much as the destination. It also includes sharing your passion with others. No one said that you cannot have a little fun and laughter at work. People spend a lot of time working today. Making the workplace somewhere that employees actually enjoy will ensure people are working to support and deliver your mission.

  93. While this is often more difficult for small business owners, think creatively. According to the Glassdoor survey, at Facebook, employees are frowned upon for missing important family affairs. Be flexible. Perhaps employees can work from home or shift hours to spend time with the children each day or go to school.

  94. Make sure every employee understands he or she contributes to the mission and vision. This is about connecting the dots for each employee, not only when they join the company, but consistently while working for your company. Your mission should be your rallying cry and help each employee know what they are contributing to daily. It provides your measurement tool as well.

  95. Many of the companies at the top of these lists also may make these same employees feel miserable. Why would employees rate their companies as the ideal place to work when, in fact, these same employees feel exhausted, overwhelmed and maybe even become ill due to the long hours and lack of rest and recovery time? According to the qualitative research from the New York Times, today’s employees are prisoners of low expectations. And they are worn-out.

  96. The system of positive sanctions is necessary for any arrangement of social order and workplaces are no exception to this rule. Rewards are crucial for inducing encouragement of a certain form of behavior. Psychologists call this ‘Positive Reinforcement’ under operant conditioning according to which rewarding certain workers for their efforts lead to a more motivated and hardworking workforce. The reward in question does not have to necessarily be monetary. This could be a simple gesture of appreciation as well.

  97. For those businesses that are adamant to thrive, it is very important to define an agenda for themselves- that the company stands for and what your long-term goals are. A clearly defined vision is very important for an ideal working environment since it almost acts as a compass. It is also of significant importance to determine the role of each employee as well as their individual contribution to the big picture.

  98. It is important to talk about transparency in leadership again. This is because it is really important to make sure that the leaders are accessible, accommodating and carry out an open conversation with their staff. The staff must know about the company vision and the goals for the upcoming months (at least). There must be no back talking and everyone must be able to deliver his ideas with freedom. Politics must be reduced to a minimum and equality among the workers must be practiced.

  99. Soft skills, on the other hand, revolve around interpersonal skills that affect the morale of the organization. Organizations that focus on development have clear aims of training new employees and re-training old ones to enhance the productivity of the whole unit in the long run.

  100. The two types of skills: hard and soft skills have a direct impact on the productivity of the place. With the changing trends and working style, it is important to have information and updates about it (hard skills). For instance, social media services revolve around social media marketing and the trends keep on changing every now and then. What professionals there do is that they train their subordinates accordingly so that their firm can excel.

  101. Constructive feedback from managers can also be of great assistance for the worker and can boost their morale and self-esteem. Thus, another thing that the work environment must have is the support for innovation and creativity. In order to promote out of the box thinking, it is important to trust your employees. Research claims that 90% of workers value honesty, trust and fairness in workplace relationships and these can be fostered through proactively maintaining healthy interpersonal relationships between managers and workers as well as regular, consistent communication. By boosting mutual feelings of trust, a culture of creativity can be effectively fostered.

  102. In a time of rapid advancements and competitive changes, it is indispensable for organizations to keep up, retain flexibility and train workers accordingly. Technology is evolving with unparalleled haste in today’s day and age which means that most methods used a decade ago could now be obsolete. This proves that adaptability is crucial for businesses in this era.

  103. A business cannot succeed without creativity culture. Workers value an office environment where they can get a chance to learn, thrive and compete. Only then, will it be possible to cross the limiting barriers, show their creative skills and reach the next level in their career?

  104. You need to make sure that the workers are engaged in their work as an engaged employee is more useful to the business industry. A Dale Carnegie Training’s Infographic on engaged employees says that companies which have engaged employees outperform those with disengaged ones by 202%. It’s a huge number, isn’t it?

  105. Grant Butrum, a dedicated employee, once said, “I could go on and on about my work environment but at the end of the day, the most important thing that I notice is that people work hard and enjoy their job when they work for a company that genuinely cares for their employees. You can’t ask for a better environment!”

  106. For a business to succeed in the global market, it is necessary that the working team maintains harmony in the workplace. While working, the foremost thing that affects the productivity of the personnel and the efficiency of the workflow is the office environment. The workers have to spend more than one-quarter of their day devoted to working in order to increase the sales and return on investment of the business. This calls for an ideal working environment.

  107. These are some of the things which you can include in your answer so that the recruiter understands very well that you are someone who knows exactly what you want. Those who have no real experience in the business world will answer this question by only referring to the physical environment in the office. This question includes a lot of different points which you ought to keep in mind. If your answers during an interview appear incomplete and very off point then it is obvious that the company will not hire you onboard. Companies long to hire those people who are able to look at things in an objective and holistic manner.

  108. An ideal working environment is one where there are no distractions. It is an environment which is conducive to work. In addition to this, there should be proper food and drink provided so that when working hard the employee’s health does not suffer in any way. Having a balanced diet is something which is very important.

  109. When you are asked this question be sure to state that an ideal working environment is one where all the employees are given praise when it is due to them. No one constantly tries to put them down just for a tiny mistake which they might have made when getting a job done. After all, we are just human beings and not gods. Making mistakes is something which is natural.

  110. An interview is where you have to really show all that you have to offer. If you are unable to put your best foot forward then a good job opportunity will slip through your hands. On being asked this question state that an ideal working environment is one where people are ever willing to help you if you are in trouble. They assist you whenever you are feeling low or down. It is the job of company’s boss to ensure his company runs as a well-oiled machine.

  111. An ideal working environment is most obviously one where all the employees work unanimously as a team. No one is trying to get ahead, by putting the next one down. It is rather unfortunate that the business world is rather famous for being cutthroat. State in your answer that though you are someone who would love to get ahead and be successful in your career, you would never consider even for a moment doing something like this. You would consider a working environment as ideal if everyone was secure in their own position and work collectively for the good of the company.

  112. The moment employees understand that promotions are being given based on favoritism then that is the thing which is going to make them feel betrayed. When you are asked this question by the recruiter state that you believe an ideal working environment is one where merit is rewarded at all times. There is no discriminated on the basis of caste creed or sex. Saying this will really show you to be someone who is very clear-sighted and morally righteous.

  113. Once the employees are aware of the fact that such corruption is taking place behind closed doors it is unlikely that they will be feeling like giving their best towards the company. State in your answer that you are someone who values honesty and integrity above everything else and it is for this reason that you consider an ideal working environment one where there is no corruption of any kind.

  114. Once asked this question you should state that you believe an ideal working environment is one where the seniors are very helpful and supportive to the newcomers. No employee whether young or old should be made to feel inferior in any manner. State that you are someone who would be always willing to help a fresher if you were in a position of advantage.

  115. Workplace violence is something which is more common than you might think. There are many employees especially women who often feel very threatened and worried when they walk into their place of work. Due to the fear playing on these victims minds they are unable to bring out the best in themselves. When the person taking your interviewer asks you this question, state that an ideal working environment is one where no one has any kind of fear playing on their mind. A working environment should be well guarded by armed securities, who know exactly what to do when trouble of any kind breaks out.

  116. People who are brimming with new ideas and dreams never have time for such pettiness. So when the recruiter of the companies asks you such a question in the course of your interview, do state that an ideal working environment is one where people are constantly so preoccupied with their work and projects at hand that they never sit around ideally gossiping about people who they don’t like. State boldly that you are someone who never indulges in things like this because you find it very low.

  117. There are many companies which try and curb the creativity of the employees by telling them to always go by the books, yet a company which has an ideal working environment will not instill such fear in the minds of those who are working under them. Employees should be taught that failure is something which is a part of life which cannot be run away from.

  118. If a working atmosphere is very repulsive and negative then employees are never going to feel like doing the best they can do. All employees should be adequately rewarded when they happen to do a task well. If the employees are never given bonuses or incentives then they will see no need to push the boundaries and excel at every task which is handed to them.

  119. Good quality work is never produced in an atmosphere or environment of noise or chaos. All individuals need to function in a calm and stress-free manner in order to bring out the best in themselves. So the candidate must answer by saying that an ideal working environment is one which is quiet and peaceful so that the employees are really able to get in touch with their inner thoughts as well as feelings.

  120. It is no secret that we are living in a technological age and if companies do not keep up with the changing times it is unlikely that they will be able to compete properly with other leading businesses. So in the course of your answer, do mention that an ideal working environment is one where there is proper infrastructure available for the employees so that they are able to do all their work in a proper and time efficient manner.

  121. No individual likes working in an environment which is dirty and unhygienic. Keeping the office clean is not merely the responsibility of the cleaning staff, but it is the responsibility of everyone working in the company as well. Saying this will really leave a good impression in the mind of the person taking your interview.

  122. When employees fulfill their various needs and goals in life, such as those of family, friends, spiritual pursuits, self-growth, etc, they can then feel more confident about themselves and perform their best at work. Apart from that, employees that are exposed to more experiences in life outside of work can use what they’ve gained and apply that to their work.

  123. Such two-way open communication will eventually break down the hurdles present in hierarchical or bureaucratic organizations. At the end of it all, it promotes trust in day-to-day interactions between co-workers, as well as between subordinates and supervisors.

  124. It is thus essential for staff to discuss the organization’s philosophy, mission and values, from time to time during retreats, meetings, etc to ensure that everyone knows what they’re working for other than their paychecks. Having open discussions get people involved and allow them to share their views and perspectives on how to achieve company goals. After which, the management side will give their own perspectives on how to fulfill the organization’s mission.

  125. Due to the job variety available in the marketplace, this article is probably a little generic and may not apply to all types of jobs. However, these qualities are much valued by employees and employers in most jobs. I would say that they are pretty universal in that sense, except in a few exceptional cases.

  126. If you’re looking for a new job, then I would say that assessing the work environment is a crucial step you shouldn’t skip. After all, this is the place you might be working at in future and you wouldn’t want to be dragging yourself to work every single morning!

  127. Aside from the job scope itself, one factor that significantly influences how employees feel about work is the environment. By work environment, I mean everything that forms part of employees’ involvement with the work itself, such as the relationship with co-workers and supervisors, organizational culture, room for personal development, etc.

  128. When employees choose a space that makes them comfortable, give them the freedom to customize their area, as everyone works differently, said Josh Turner, CEO of user feedback platform UsersThink. He suggested getting rid of the “same-issued everything” and giving everyone a budget to customize their own setup.

  129. Make it easy for workers to purchase things like exercise balls and plants on the company dime, said AJ Shankar, CEO, and founder of litigation software company Everlaw. We also trust our employees to manage their own time. They’re free to take breaks to play games or just recharge as necessary.

  130. Blue-enriched light bulbs may reduce fatigue and increase happiness and work performance, according to the article. Use this type of lighting in brainstorming rooms. In a meeting or break rooms, use warmer tones to promote calmness and relaxation. In conference rooms, use middle tones that welcome workers while keeping them alert.

  131. An article by MBA@UNC, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Kenan-Flagler’s online MBA program, states that exposure to natural light improves mood and energy, greatly impacting focus and productivity. But according to a survey by Pots Planters and More, nearly half of office workers said there is little to no natural light in their office.

  132. If you have gone on even one job interview it is likely you have heard questions that ask you to describe your strengths and weaknesses and where you expect to see yourself in five years’ time. Another common question is “What would be your ideal working environment?” It is one of the ways in which interviewers can determine how compatible you are for the position and company. Compatibility is critically important; an employee who fits in is likely to be happier and more productive and so will everyone else.

  133. No one can work effectively in a sea of noise or interruptions. When planning your office area, ensure that it affords a degree of privacy from surrounding activities. While headphones may serve to isolate certain sounds, no one wants to be forced to wear headphones all the time. Portable screens can be used to shield the work area from nearby activities. Alternatively, divider walls that double as bookcases will not only divide the area but provide superior storage solutions.

  134. The most effective lighting brings out the fullest quality of the colors illuminated. If lighting levels are too low, there can be negative psychological effects, including depression. For human comfort, a yellow-cast illumination is best. It is the color of brightness, and midway through the color progression from cool to warm.

  135. If no daylight is available, a combination of general and task lighting will be required. A high-quality task light will be essential for late nights or cloudy days. If your home office is in a basement or a room without windows, check out daylight-replicating light sources that will provide energy-efficient, full-spectrum lighting. Many ergonomic task-lighting fixtures have dimmer switches so you can control the amount of light.

  136. If your space has a window, it will enhance the lighting. Daylight is the most evenly balanced source of white light available, in that sunlight has an approximately equal proportion of each color of the spectrum. This light, however, never has a constant color and its beauty comes from the way it is reflected and from the way it is refracted by the earth (as in differing times of day).

  137. If you want to know if your candidates have this trait, ask a simple question in the interview such as, “Why should we hire you?”. This way they have to sell themselves in a persuasive manner while listing qualities, traits, and reasons—a perfect, practical test of their customer service skills.

  138. The HR team, or the person conducting the interview, should also know how to decipher a resumé in order to find the right match. When reading through your prospective employee’s resumé, look for keywords in their testimonials such as “works well with others” and “maintains a positive attitude”.

  139. Discipline in the office depends upon him. The rules and principles of the management should be followed by the subordinates. He must have the ability to speak. New methods cannot be accepted unless the full explanation is followed. He has to convince others about the factual findings.

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  141. What type of world do you want? Personally, I want my apple to be affordable and free of hazardous toxins; I want access to clean drinking water and I want communities in Brazil to have it too; I want city kids to know that ketchup is made from tomatoes that grow in dirt and country kids to know that good public transportation can mean an incredible amount of freedom.

  142. A confident employee is also more willing to take risks or go for challenges that an uncertain counterpart would shy from. Great outcomes come from people who have faith in their abilities and talents. If the candidate is someone who you would want to interact directly with a client(s), the latter two will be impressed by the person’s self-assuredness and therefore feel like continuing the business relationship with him/her and your company.